American Transmission Co.

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Blog | American Transmission Co. - Part 3

Village of Bristol establishes native oak savannah with help from ATC

The Village of Bristol removed invasive vegetation and planted nearly 50 native oak trees in the new Bristol Bay Park this summer. The trees planted were a mix of six different types of oak trees.

The effort was funded with a $5,000 grant from American Transmission Co.’s Community Planting Program that was matched by the Village. When Bristol Bay Park is fully developed, it will be a 37-acre natural area park with an oak savanna along its walking trails.

Once common in the Midwest, forming a boundary between prairies and forests, oak savannas are now one of the rarest ecosystems on earth. The openness of an oak savanna, with large trees growing far apart, enables numerous types of native prairie plants to grow. That openness is usually maintained by fire, as oaks are a fire resistant tree species. The Village plans to conduct periodic controlled burns to maintain the savanna.

ATC’s Community Planting Program enables us to encourage and support communities to plant trees and vegetation that beautify the landscape in a way that doesn’t compromise the safety and reliability of the electric transmission system.

The Program provides financial support to eligible cities, villages, towns, counties and tribes in ATC’s service area for planting projects on public property, outside transmission line rights-of-way. Program funds can be used to plant trees and other tall-growing vegetation. Since 2013, ATC has awarded approximately 240 communities and organizations with funds totaling more than $425,000.

ATC accepts applications from July 1 through Sept. 30, and award recipients are selected and notified by the end of the year. Awards range from $100 to $5,000. Additional information and program applications can be found at atc-GrowSmart.com

ATC and Melinda Myers offer free virtual gardening series

Join gardening expert Melinda Myers for a free virtual gardening series beginning next week. This ATC-sponsored series will provide valuable insight into some key sustainable gardening topics. Each virtual gardening class will help deepen your horticulture knowledge, enhance your gardening skills, and provide a recipe for transforming any space into a more ecofriendly, productive landscape. Register for one or the entire series!

Wednesday, July 22, 6:30 p.m. – Food Gardening for Everyone – There’s Still Time to Plant & Maximize Your Harvest 

Wednesday, Aug 5, 6:30 p.m. – Managing Garden Pests while Keeping Pollinators Safe 

Wednesday, Aug 12, 6:30 p.m. – Waterwise Gardening 

Wednesday, Aug 19, 6:30 p.m. – Creating Pollinator Gardens 

Wednesday, Aug 26, 6:30 p.m. – Strategies for Adding Native Plants to Your Landscape & the Many Benefits! 

Wednesday, Sep 2, 6:30 p.m. – Save Money and Improve Your Soil for Better Gardening Results 

Wednesday, Sep 9, 6:30 p.m. – Fall is for Planting – Grow Smart Plants for You and the Pollinators to Enjoy! 

Wednesday, Oct 7, 6:30 p.m. – Fall Care for the Landscape and Pollinators 

Wednesday, Oct 14, 6:30 p.m. – The First Steps to Creating an Eco-friendly, Low Maintenance Landscape 

Since 2014, ATC has partnered with Melinda Myers to help landowners learn about compatible vegetation near transmission lines. Trees and shrubs are an important part of the landscape. But trees, shrubs and transmission lines can be an unsafe combination. Transmission lines can sway or sag, and tall or nearby vegetation can compromise the safety and reliability of the electric transmission system. ATC’s Grow Smart program helps property owners and communities identify low-growing, beautiful, native vegetation that can be planted the smart way – a safe distance from transmission line rights-of-way.

Iron Mountain improves tree diversity with help from ATC

The City of Iron Mountain’s Public Works department recently planted 18 trees along West A Street thanks to a $2,000 grant from American Transmission Co.’s Community Planting Program. The trees, a mix of linden and hackberry, are part of the City’s five-year plan to add more diverse trees along its streets.

“We’re excited to add more trees between downtown and our schools,” said Isaac Micheau, Treasurer, City of Iron Mountain. “With this grant from ATC, we’re able to help diversity our city’s tree population, along with providing shade and additional natural beauty in our community.”

ATC’s Community Planting Program enables us to encourage and support communities to plant trees and vegetation that beautify the landscape in a way that doesn’t compromise the safety and reliability of the electric transmission system. The Program provides financial support to eligible cities, villages, towns, counties and tribes in ATC’s service area for planting projects on public property, outside transmission line rights-of-way. Program funds can be used to plant trees and other tall-growing vegetation outside the transmission line rights-of-way. Since 2013, ATC has awarded approximately 240 communities and organizations with funds totaling more than $425,000.

ATC accepts applications from July 1 through Sept. 30, and award recipients are selected and notified by the end of the year. Awards range from $100 to $5,000. Additional information and program applications can be found at atc-GrowSmart.com.

 

City of Marinette adds to greenspace with help from ATC

City of Marinette Forester Todd Lapacz and several students from a Marinette High School environmental science class planted five landscape beds in the greenspace separating the Marinette High School entrance road and Community Recreation Center parking lot.

Each bed included a center tree surrounded by low-growing, pollinator-friendly plants in the school’s colors. Three beds were planted with Skyline Honey Locust trees surrounded by Russian Sage and Purple or Veronica Salvia. The two other beds were planted with an Autumn Blaze Freeman Maple tree surrounded by Karl Foerster grass and Purple Coneflower. The tree purchase was made possible by a $1,900 grant from ATC’s Community Planting Program.

“The students were excited to create landscape beds,” said Todd Lapacz, City Forester, City of Marinette. “With this grant from ATC, we’re able to diversity Marinette’s tree population, and provide shade and additional natural beauty to our community.”

Lapacz also told the students why planting the trees in that location was important. The trees will help to filter the air pollution from the cars in the parking lot and will slow down the amount of runoff into the parking lot.

ATC’s Community Planting Program enables us to encourage and support communities to plant trees and vegetation that beautify the landscape in a way that doesn’t compromise the safety and reliability of the electric transmission system. The Program provides financial support to eligible cities, villages, towns, counties and tribes in ATC’s service area for planting projects on public property, outside transmission line rights-of-way. Program funds can be used to plant trees and other tall-growing vegetation outside the transmission line rights-of-way. Since 2013, ATC has awarded approximately 240 communities and organizations with funds totaling more than $425,000.

ATC accepts applications from July 1 through Sept. 30, and award recipients are selected and notified by the end of the year. Awards range from $100 to $5,000. Additional information and program applications can be found at atc-GrowSmart.com.

Protecting pollinators and their habitats

When’s the last time you thanked a pollinator? Perhaps it’s time you did. This week is National Pollinator Week, a time to celebrate pollinators and focus on what we can do to help them thrive.

Globally, about 1,000 plants we depend on for food and products need to be pollinated by animals. About 75% of all plants, including those in our yards, gardens, and parks, also depend on pollinators. But the biggest threat to pollinators is related to the habitat they depend on to survive. As native vegetation is replaced by roadways, lawns, crops and non-native gardens, pollinators lose the food and nesting sites they need.

ATC is uniquely positioned to help support and promote pollinator habitat. Many of our transmission rights-of-way are perfect for low-growing, pollinator-friendly native vegetation. Our support of pollinator habitat focuses on three main areas – our educational Grow Smart program, our Pollinator Habitat grant program and our own efforts to increase pollinator habitat in the transmission rights-of-way we manage.

Grow Smart, grow low for pollinators

ATC’s Grow Smart program helps property owners and communities identify low-growing, beautiful, native vegetation that can be planted the smart way – a safe distance from transmission line rights-of-way.

Since 2014, ATC has partnered with nationally known gardening expert Melinda Myers to help landowners learn about compatible vegetation near transmission lines. On Tuesday, June 23, Melinda appeared on WTMJ’s Morning Blend providing tips for managing pests while keeping plants safe and increasing pollinator habitat by adding native pollinator-friendly plants to your landscaping.

Want to add some pollinator-friendly plants to your yard? View or print our Grow Smart Planting Guide or Grow Smart Pollinator Guide and bring it to your local garden center.